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Are Fruit Trees a Good Fit for a Rental Property?

Two Inverness Renters Picking Fruit Off A Tree In Their YardYou may have figured out that having at least a tree or two in your Inverness rental property’s landscaping can help boost your rental rate. And there is some great evidence to foster that notion. However, it’s crucial to consider that the type of tree you plant has just as much to do with increasing your cash flows. Not all kinds of trees actually fit right in a rental situation.

The question to ask is whether planting fruit trees on a rental property is a good plan. Granting that there are no hard and fast rules about which type of tree is ideal, certainly, taking into account that different trees grow better in different climates, it’s critical to assess all aspects of fruit trees in question before making your final decision.

The Best Trees for Rental Properties

A profitable rental property has superb curb appeal. And a significant part of that curb appeal is placing one or more pretty, shady trees in the yard. The best trees for a rental property are those that grow well in your climate, extend both visual appeal and shade, but certainly are similarly simple to maintain. If that seems like a tall order, don’t fret. Trees that fit the bill in many parts of the country include evergreen arborvitae, spruce, flowering dogwoods, and maple trees. Oak and desert willow can also be perfect options for rental properties. These trees grow well, yield shade relatively right away, and don’t involve a lot of pruning from year to year.

The Skinny on Fruit Trees

Many Inverness property managers may consider that a fruit tree would be an inviting feature in a rental house. And the majority of renters desire the idea of growing and eating fruit straight from the yard. But be aware that except in the case that your tenant is experienced in the care and maintenance of fruit trees and has the time to do the job effectively, fruit trees can be an unwanted burden. For some renters, the work that fruit trees need can be a crucial concern, so much so that they may even choose not to apply for or stay in a rental that has them.

If the best trees for rental properties are low-maintenance, that excludes fruit trees entirely. It’s likely the number one reason you wouldn’t certainly like to plant fruit trees at a rental property is the mess and maintenance that comes with them. Some fruit trees do need years of care and growth before they can start producing fruit. Most are very picky with heat, cold, watering amounts, and so on.

Fruit trees moreover need correct pruning and fumigation to produce edible fruit every year, which many people don’t really care that much about. Apart from that, fruit often attracts unwanted insects and rodents, which can be a new difficulty your tenant won’t like working on. Except in the case that you or your tenant are willing to put in the time and effort that fruit trees need, it’s presumably best to avoid them totally.

Fruit Trees in the Lease Documents

If you’re willing to accept the responsibility of having fruit trees on your rental property, you must include verbiage in your lease that clearly outlines your tenant’s obligations where those trees are concerned. It is not right to assign landscaping maintenance to your tenant; they may not know that this consists of regular pruning and clean-up after fruit trees, which is indeed a lot of extra work. This is why if you aren’t planning to take care of the trees yourself, see to it to explain in your lease documents that the tenants need to care for the trees or hire a professional to do it for them.

At Real Property Management Diversified, we work closely together with rental property owners like you to help create attractively, low-maintenance landscaping your tenants won’t surely mind keeping up. Contact us today to learn more.

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